belindapendragon:

isaia:

blackpowerisforblackmen:

Lupita was recently named the most beautiful by People’s Magazine, and some of their readers expressed their dissatisfaction with this decision  in the comment section. One reader even commented that Lupita didn’t deserve this title because she’s 100% black(she finds women unattractive if they’re 100% black). These comments made me think of the brilliant post made by radicalrebellion

White women (non-black women of color included in this as well) become offended and angry when a black woman (especially a dark skinned black woman like Lupita) is depicted as beautiful and worthy of appreciation because it jeopardizes their position as the epitome of beauty and womanhood. Black women are viewed as the antithesis of White beauty and womanhood, these white women are completely apathetic and silent when dark skinned Black women are portrayed as “ugly” and “unlovable” by the mainstream media because they benefit from this oppression. That’s why you never see white supermodels discussing racism and colorism in the fashion industry. However, these readers wouldn’t complain if it were light skinned black women like Halle Berry, Beyonce, or Rihanna (we all know why, hint: colorism). Anyway, congratulations to the ***flawless Lupita for being named the most beautiful!  

This is why this is important.

Amen…

(Reblogged from steppauseturnpausepivotstepstep)

interpretivescreaming:

postwhitesociety:

postwhitesociety:

fuckyeahlavernecox:

Filming #freeCeCe with the one and only CeCe McDonald in Madison Square Park.” (x)

Legs for days, weeks, months, years!!!

CECE LOOK SO GOOD

gotta reblog this again cause cece look the fuck good

"Legs from here to Ya-Ya!"

TWOC Excellence.

(Reblogged from blackfeminismlives)

somehowfurious:

kissing-monsters:

apiphile:

sexxxisbeautiful:

pizzagrrrl:

Peggielene Bartels, A.K.A. King Peggy, is currently the King of Otuam, Ghana. She was chosen to be one of only three female kings in Ghana, and when she discovered that male chauvinists wanted her to only be a figurehead, she said: “They were treating me like I am a second-class citizen because I am a woman. I said, ‘Hell no, you’re not going to do this to a woman!’” When she encountered corruption and the threat of embezzlement to the royal funds, she declared “I’m going to squeeze their balls so hard their eyes pop!”

King Peggy has maintained her work in Ghana’s embassy in Washington, D.C. while making education affordable in Otuam, installing borehead wells to produce clean drinking water, enforcing incarceration laws to deal with domestic violence, replenishing the royal coffers by taxing Otuam’s fishing industry to improve life in the village, and appointing three women to her council.

“Nobody should tell you, ‘You’re a woman, you can’t do it,’” she insists. “You can do it. Be ready to accept it when the calling comes.”

Quoted from the Spring/Summer 2012 issue of Ms. Magazine.

What a beautiful badass woman.

King Peggy has been on my blog before but this is my goddamn blog and I will have King Peggy on here twice if I want.

MORE FEMALE KINGS.

Always reblog King Peggy, who is on my dash far less than she should be. Did you know she has written a book about her life? It is great, and you should all get right on that if you haven’t already.

(Source: pizza-grrrl)

(Reblogged from steppauseturnpausepivotstepstep)
I think, for us, when we first started talking about Trek- I remember in the very first meeting- probably about five minutes in, we basically said “How in gods name are we going to get our wives to go see this movie?” Other than the fact that they’re married to us. You know, we will not be successful in rebooting Trek unless we can get women to enjoy the movie. And that’s where I feel, like, at least the birth of [Kirk] really had that going for it

Damon Lindelof (Star Trek 2009 commentary)

Oh yes, that’s correct, because as a woman I wouldn’t like Star Trek unless Kirk was incredibly good-looking… Um, excuse me?! Does anyone else just get angry reading this?! 

(via skivvyy)

It’s like, I understand that they want to go after women. When it comes to scifi, women are often overlooked, so it makes sense, it’s a smart business decision to think about women… But writing in a birth scene? THAT’S your master plan?

(via thetrekkiehasthephonebox)

They probably could have gotten more women to like it if they had stayed truer to the spirit of the series.  Since, you know.  We were the ones who kept it alive all those years.

But nah the ladies all like girly shit like who ever heard of a girl nerd amirite.

Pee on Hollywood gender essentialism.

(via flarechaser)

How are you going to get your wives to see the movie? Gee, I dunno, how about writing good women characters? How about making a story that’s not all about dudes? How about not killing women characters for the dudes’ plot development? How about not having women characters strip down to their underwear for literally no plot reason at all?

How about, like, portraying women as people? TOS, for all its faults, could at least (sometimes) do that!

Also? It wouldn’t hurt to get some women on your creative team. I’m just sayin’.

(via kiriamaya)

Women in our creative team? Hahahahahahahahaha like women are creative. *insert barfing here*

(Source: startrekaus)

(Reblogged from lisaquestions)

raavynndigital:

itsopheliablack:

raavynndigital:

itsopheliablack:

raavynndigital:

itsopheliablack:

camwhoreconfessional:

dopafiend:

norsegays:

astrolope:

People being angry about ~dem gays~ on Target’s Facebook.

I just want to give my two cents on this and tell you a story.

A couple weeks ago, I was hired at Target. I have a job at Target. Not a big deal right?

It is a big deal because i’m a transman

It doesn’t take a genius to conclude that it’s hard for me, my brothers, and sisters to get a job. There are legal restraints regarding the job and if you don’t pass, it’s hard to be taken seriously at a job interview.

Right on the application, it asks what your preferred name is. It also asks if there is anything that target should know. I put the fact that I am a transman, expecting not to get a call because usually when you put that down, people will throw out the application. I got TWO interviews.

At the interview, they asked me about it. I told them I am on hormones and they told me that they didn’t care. Not in the sense that they don’t emotionally care, but that it didn’t matter. I was male and that’s all that mattered. They also told me that they give sex same couples benefits in states that do not recognize them as a married couple.

At my job orientation, I was not misgendered once. Even my supervisors who weren’t sure of my gender avoided pronoun use, which I found only happens when you’ve had pronoun training. They gave me a name tag with my preferred name and didn’t ask questions. I felt safe and respected, which is huge for a trans* person.

TLDR: Target is amazing not just for the LGB, but also the T. Shop there for the rest of your life.

That is really amazing I wish I had a reason to shop at target 

I spent $60 or so at Target today because I needed retail therapy and felt kinda guilty because I didn’t get what I went their to get (a new cute spring top).

This just wiped away all buyers remorse. I should go back tomorrow.

I’m buying stuff for my new place at Target now!

This is awesome. I have other issues with stores like Target, but I can’t fault them on this. Way to go, Target.

Of course they aren’t perfect at all, but it’s a good start. Giving them our business BECAUSE of things like this reinforces that they won’t be losing business by being semi decent.

True. I just wish they’d pay more and not buy from companies that exploit laborers. But most retail stores have those problems, tbh.

Capitalism ftw…

Exactly.

Their political contributions are also a problem. It was not so long ago that they gave all the cash they legally could to a massive homophobe running for governor in Minnesota (where they’re headquartered) because he was going to abolish the state income tax for corporations. They want to have it both ways, making nice to the LGBTQ community for our dollars while supporting politicians who couldn’t care less if we died. I l’m not sure that marriage registries for gays and a single anecdote (though nice) about hiring a trans man makes up for that.

(Reblogged from raavynndigital)
(Reblogged from lisaquestions)

ethiopienne:

gradientlair:

Here’s Ava DuVernay’s new short titled Say Yes. It beautiful. It’s breathtaking. It’s a portrait of love. But not just romantic love, which is obvious, as the story centers around a marriage proposal. I see cultural love here. I see a love of food, dance, music and art. I see love of shared time spent together and love of shared and divergent styles, aesthetics, and expressions. I see love of friendship. I see love of family. I see love of beauty. I see love of life. I see Black love, which to me is more than heterosexual romantic love, though it includes that too. Black love is nuance. Black love is individuality and cultural collectivity.

So we have to talk about the camera work. Exquisite. We have to talk about the clothing, and shoes (wow, when Kali walks at 5:55, yasss please send me those shoes!) and makeup. We have to talk about how Ava and her team understands that when music (in addition to the visuals, of course) is doing the communicating (as there is no spoken script) the synchrony between the music and the visuals are critical. They get this. It’s…magic. It’s perfect.

The pacing of this short is brilliant. A film under 8 minutes yet it feels like it is perfectly paced and not rushed. This reveals the brilliance of a good director, and that’s Ava. She leads us very slowly yet not too slowly to that pivotal moment of the kiss from 5:58-6:21. You know it’s coming and when it does you can’t help but feel the excitement of their love. Kali Hawk and Lance Gross truly shine here. It also was cool to see glimpses of Issa Rae and Lorraine Toussaint among those at the party.

Alas, there’s also another love that I see here. I see Ava DuVernay’s love for Black people. Her respect. Her kindness. Her connection to her own people. She loves us in a way that truthfully is scarce in mainstream art though it thrives among many Black women who create compelling portraits of Black life in a variety of mediums, mainstream attention or not.

I appreciate that Ava reflects who we actually are. There’s honesty in her work. There’s integrity. There’s still spontaneity and creativity as well. Honesty is not diametrically opposed to creativity.

So please watch, enjoy and share this film with everyone and continue to uplift and support Ava’s brilliant work. Doing so means we’re ultimately uplifting and supporting ourselves. <3

Related Posts: my thoughts on Ava DuVernay’s short The Door, my thoughts on Ava DuVernay’s film I Will Follow

YESSSSS trudy just laid out all of my feels about this breathtaking short film!

(Reblogged from broadlybrazen)

kiriamaya:

ineedtothinkofatitle:

dear caretakers of children: stop telling kids “I don’t care who started it!”. you’re teaching children to ignore unequal power balances. that leads to legitimate belief in things like reverse racism, misandry, heterophobia, etc. you’re teaching children that it’s wrong to retaliate when they are wronged. “who started it” is very, very relevant.

THANK YOU

(Reblogged from kiriamaya)

rightnowbb:

You can’t have capitalism without ableism and classism. It’s not just that it’s not working out in practice; it’s a paradox on paper.

Without the oppression of all non-oligarchs or even those in the oligarch class who display subversive behavior. Capitalism is inherently oppressive, it cannot function without unjust exploitation.

(Reblogged from clatterbane)

You find yourself in a group of people standing next to a cliff.

Suddenly, someone pushes another person, sending them over the edge. Thankfully, the victim is able to hold on to the edge rather than fall to their death, but nobody makes a move to help them or stop the perpetrator. Everyone, including yourself, simply stands there watching.

Angry that they’ve been pushed, angry that nobody is helping them as they struggle not to fall, the victim screams, ‘Is anybody going to fucking help me??’

That gets everyone’s attention. ‘Why are you mad at me?’ one person asks. ‘I didn’t push you.’

'Nobody is going to want to help you with an attitude like that.'

'You're just as bad as him.'

Nobody makes a move to help.

The victim screams in frustration, their fingers slipping. ‘You’ve got to be fucking joking!’ they shout as they lose their grip.

'You catch more flies with honey than with vinegar.' You say as you walk away.

Welcome to the anti-sj/’real justice’ movement.

(via princenmonster)

some of the anti sj will step on that person’s fingers too because they think they’re being “too harsh”

(via princexneeshydoomcuddles)

(Reblogged from raavynndigital)
raavynndigital:

the-feminist-fangirl:

thebestworstidea:

resilientkate:

softgore:


“This piece was primarily a trust exercise, in which she told viewers she would not move for six hours no matter what they did to her.  She placed 72 objects one could use in pleasing or destructive ways, ranging from flowers and a feather boa to a knife and a loaded pistol, on a table near her and invited the viewers to use them on her however they wanted.  
Initially, Abramović said, viewers were peaceful and timid, but it escalated to violence quickly.  “The experience I learned was that … if you leave decision to the public, you can be killed… I felt really violated: they cut my clothes, stuck rose thorns in my stomach, one person aimed the gun at my head, and another took it away. It created an aggressive atmosphere. After exactly 6 hours, as planned, I stood up and started walking toward the public. Everyone ran away, escaping an actual confrontation.”
This piece revealed something terrible about humanity, similar to what Philip Zimbardo’s Stanford Prison Experiment or Stanley Milgram’s Obedience Experiment, both of which also proved how readily people will harm one another under unusual circumstances.” 
This performance showed just how easy it is to dehumanize a person who doesn’t fight back, and is particularly powerful because it defies what we think we know about ourselves. I’m certain the no one reading this believes the people around him/her capable of doing such things to another human being, but this performance proves otherwise.”

this is why performance art is important


So every single person who told me ‘ignore them they’ll go away’ and ‘you can’t let them know they bothered you’ and ‘They’ll stop if they don’t see you react’ and all that bull shit, my entire school career, I want you to look good and hard at this.
I want you to think about what you said.
What you keep saying.
What you are telling your children.
You are making them powerless.

Bolded for emphasis.

This. “Being nice” never saved anyone.

raavynndigital:

the-feminist-fangirl:

thebestworstidea:

resilientkate:

softgore:

“This piece was primarily a trust exercise, in which she told viewers she would not move for six hours no matter what they did to her.  She placed 72 objects one could use in pleasing or destructive ways, ranging from flowers and a feather boa to a knife and a loaded pistol, on a table near her and invited the viewers to use them on her however they wanted. 

Initially, Abramović said, viewers were peaceful and timid, but it escalated to violence quickly.  “The experience I learned was that … if you leave decision to the public, you can be killed… I felt really violated: they cut my clothes, stuck rose thorns in my stomach, one person aimed the gun at my head, and another took it away. It created an aggressive atmosphere. After exactly 6 hours, as planned, I stood up and started walking toward the public. Everyone ran away, escaping an actual confrontation.”

This piece revealed something terrible about humanity, similar to what Philip Zimbardo’s Stanford Prison Experiment or Stanley Milgram’s Obedience Experiment, both of which also proved how readily people will harm one another under unusual circumstances.”

This performance showed just how easy it is to dehumanize a person who doesn’t fight back, and is particularly powerful because it defies what we think we know about ourselves. I’m certain the no one reading this believes the people around him/her capable of doing such things to another human being, but this performance proves otherwise.”

this is why performance art is important

So every single person who told me ‘ignore them they’ll go away’ and ‘you can’t let them know they bothered you’ and ‘They’ll stop if they don’t see you react’ and all that bull shit, my entire school career, I want you to look good and hard at this.

I want you to think about what you said.

What you keep saying.

What you are telling your children.

You are making them powerless.


Bolded for emphasis.

This. “Being nice” never saved anyone.

(Source: andrewfishman)

(Reblogged from raavynndigital)
(Reblogged from kiriamaya)
(Reblogged from readerwriterdancer)
(Reblogged from raavynndigital)
(Reblogged from stillnotanonymous)